Free-range teaching

It’s entirely possible to teach without doing or making mistakes. We memorise formulas, regurgitate recipes, and recite entire piano melodies.

Yet the lessons that we carry around today are the most painful ones.

It turns out that once we know the answer, we stop asking. We stop wondering about the colours, the materials, the process and the uses in a different situation. How does this relate to that?

Free-range teaching is the act of giving questions, to show possibilities and to sit with the tension of knowing the answers.

“If the cafe doesn’t succeed in 6 months, what will do about it?”
“What about the people who don’t read the instruction?”
“What are the pros and cons of grandma adopting crypto-currency?”

As we go about helping others level up, we have the option to decide if it is a lesson is worth understanding. If it’s worth the struggle before something clicks.

It might be convenient to give the answer but when a new complex problem shows up, then don’t expect someone to out-perform google.

The alternative is an inconvenient way of teaching, free-range.

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